Tag Archives: strike

Doctors’ Strikes: Time For One Final Push

An open letter from the NHSpace blog to all those doctors considering what action to take.

Dear doctors,

You’ve come a long way since the ballot on industrial action last year. You’ve forced the government to come back to the table at least twice, and got concessions out of them. You did this by maintaining a united front, and by being honest and measured whilst your opponents were being deceitful and excessive.

That’s why you still hold the cards. Hunt went all-in months ago with his ‘imposition’. He has no greater sanction left, and can only harm you in the court of public opinion. And so Hunt is trying to convince the public to turn against you.

“Hunt’s contract is far more damaging than any strike. He’s stretched the NHS so thin that people are already falling through the cracks.”

But he hasn’t succeeded yet. A new poll shows 57% of the public still support the strikes, and 51% believe Hunt should not have been reappointed. You can still win the public relations battle. Just do the following:

1 – Be team players. If the public think that doctors are divided over the contract and the strikes, they’ll lose faith in you.

2 – Be constructive. If you don’t like the strikes, focus your energy on talking about the issues you want fixed, rather than attacking your colleagues.

3 – Keep the message simple. The government are still pursuing the ‘7-day NHS’ line, which is easy for the public to follow. So remember: Hunt’s contract is far more damaging than any strike. He’s stretched the NHS so thin that people are already falling through the cracks.

4 – Expect to win, and soon. The government may have put on their poker face, but underneath the pressure is showing. If you can keep the public on your side, the government will have to cave in soon.

Regardless of what you think of the strikes, you must work together to win this fight. The very future of the NHS depends on your actions in these coming days and weeks.

Best wishes,

NHAspace

Analysis: BMA Suspends Strike Action

Junior doctor Alex Ashman updates us on junior doctors’ contracts.

This afternoon, the British Medical Association (BMA) announced that they were suspending the 48 hour strike, which was due next week. Hospital management across the country are sure to have cheered at that news. But why would the BMA want to avoid industrial action? What are they asking for? And what are the government doing?

Why Did The BMA Suspend The Strike?

The threat of industrial action before Christmas was enough to force Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt into talks at the eleventh hour. Hunt had previously refused to negotiate, so this ceasefire was a small victory for the BMA.

Last week’s strike action was triggered by a lack of progress, and the need for the BMA to retain the mandate provided by the 97% of members who voted for action. The strike revealed a great deal of public support for junior doctors, and was said to have ‘landed a hit’ on Hunt.

Conciliatory talks at ACAS have now resumed, with Hunt sidelined. The BMA are obviously keen to aid the talks by suspending strike action, whilst keeping the ace in their hand – the 10th February walkout – as an incentive for the government to make a deal. Avoiding excessive strike action keeps the public on the doctors’ side, and thus keeps pressure up on the government.

Why Are The BMA Still Threatening Action?

There are several aspects of the new contract that the BMA find unfair, including:

  • Removal of safeguards that prevent unpaid overtime.
  • Classification of late evenings and Saturdays as ‘normal hours’.
  • Removal of pay for unsocial hours.
  • Removal of annual pay rises.
  • Removal of pay protection for academics and pregnant women.

Last week, the BMA stated that they still disagreed with the government on around 20 out of the 44  points being discussed.

What Are The Government Doing?

Outside of the talks, the government continue to bully junior doctors. Jeremy Hunt and David Cameron openly blame junior doctors for an imagined lack of 7-day NHS cover. Despite Hunt being criticised for misrepresenting stroke mortality figures, Cameron still repeated his misleading figures on national radio. Both the Health Secretary and the PM have gone on the record threatening the ‘nuclear option’ of forcing the contract upon junior doctors. Whispers in Whitehall are that the government are certain they will win the dispute through sheer brute force. Perhaps they have forgotten that, as with any nuclear option, they are courting mutually assured destruction.